CFBA Tour – For Pete’s Sake

Shifting gears, here’s what my wife thought about the latest book for the CFBA – For Pete’s Sake.

“I really liked this book. The setting was described so well, I felt I was there. I wish I could meet the characters, I felt I knew them so well. The author was so natural in describing each one. Overall a great book, quick read, and I highly recommend it.”

The synopsis:
ABOUT THE BOOK

For Pete’s Sake is a remarkable story about the unlikely live between a grown-up tomboy and the millionaire next door.

Ellen Brittingham isn’t sure true live exists until she contracts to do the landscaping of the estate of the sophisticated widower next door, Adrian Sinclair. Adrian has it all—at least on the surface, He’s engaged to a beautiful woman who helped him build a successful business and he’ll soon have a mom for his troubled son Pete.

Yet, from the moment Ellen rescues a stranded Adrian on her Harley, his well-ordered world turns upside down, cracking his thin façade of happiness and revealing the void of faith and love behind it. Even more, his son seems to have his own sites set on Ellen – as his new mom.

As Ellen’s friendship grows with Pete, she realizes that his father is about to marry the wrong woman for the right reasons. And despite her resolve to remain “neighbors only” with the dad, the precocious boy works his way into her heart, drawing Ellen and Adrian closer. Close enough for heartbreak, for Pete’s sake!

But how can her heart think that Adrian Sinclair is the one when he’s engaged to a sophisticated beauty who is everything Ellen isn’t. When Ellen’s three best friends see she’s been bitten by the love bug, they jump into action and submit her to a makeover that reveals the woman underneath her rough exterior and puts her in contention for Adrian’s love.

But Ellen must ask herself whether she’s ready to risk the heart that she’s always held close. Will Ellen be able to trust that God brought this family into her life for a reason? Or will her fear of getting hurt cause her to turn away from God’s plan and her one true chance at love?

CFBA Tour – For Pete’s Sake

Shifting gears, here’s what my wife thought about the latest book for the CFBA – For Pete’s Sake.

“I really liked this book. The setting was described so well, I felt I was there. I wish I could meet the characters, I felt I knew them so well. The author was so natural in describing each one. Overall a great book, quick read, and I highly recommend it.”

The synopsis:
ABOUT THE BOOK

For Pete’s Sake is a remarkable story about the unlikely live between a grown-up tomboy and the millionaire next door.

Ellen Brittingham isn’t sure true live exists until she contracts to do the landscaping of the estate of the sophisticated widower next door, Adrian Sinclair. Adrian has it all—at least on the surface, He’s engaged to a beautiful woman who helped him build a successful business and he’ll soon have a mom for his troubled son Pete.

Yet, from the moment Ellen rescues a stranded Adrian on her Harley, his well-ordered world turns upside down, cracking his thin façade of happiness and revealing the void of faith and love behind it. Even more, his son seems to have his own sites set on Ellen – as his new mom.

As Ellen’s friendship grows with Pete, she realizes that his father is about to marry the wrong woman for the right reasons. And despite her resolve to remain “neighbors only” with the dad, the precocious boy works his way into her heart, drawing Ellen and Adrian closer. Close enough for heartbreak, for Pete’s sake!

But how can her heart think that Adrian Sinclair is the one when he’s engaged to a sophisticated beauty who is everything Ellen isn’t. When Ellen’s three best friends see she’s been bitten by the love bug, they jump into action and submit her to a makeover that reveals the woman underneath her rough exterior and puts her in contention for Adrian’s love.

But Ellen must ask herself whether she’s ready to risk the heart that she’s always held close. Will Ellen be able to trust that God brought this family into her life for a reason? Or will her fear of getting hurt cause her to turn away from God’s plan and her one true chance at love?

CSFF Tour – Review of Dark Sea of Darkness

What do you get when you take a talented songwriter, put him in a fantasy land, and allow him some whimsy as he tells a story? You would do pretty doggone good if you ended up with On the Edge of the Dark Sea of Darkness.

Andrew Peterson has made several critically acclaimed albums, and now he turns his talent to a tale of adventure, peril, lost jewels, and the fearsome toothy cows of Skree. Edge is the first book in the Wingfeather Saga. It is being marketed as a young adult (YA) series, but it is such an enchanting tale it shouldn’t be missed by an adult audience.

The story features Janner Igiby, his brother Tink, and their crippled sister Leeli as they go to enjoy the Dragon Day festival in their town of Glipwood. These three children live with their mother Nia and their peglegged ex-pirate grandpa Podo, and they are greatly loved. Their life would be perfect, if not for the occupation of Skree by the Fangs of Dang, led by a Nameless Evil (called Gnag the Nameless). Janner, as the oldest, is tasked with keeping an eye on his siblings, but finds this duty is harder to fulfill than originally planned. Soon they are in the midst of great adventure and danger, such as haunted houses, aforementioned toothy cows, sock men, and giant Nuggets.

This book reminds me of the movie and book The Princess Bride. Peterson creates a well-thought out fantasy world that has a wink and a nod to it. The reader can tell he had fun writing it, and the enjoyment comes out in the little goofiness sprinkled throughout. He creates little touches like fake references to Skreean literature such as “Taming the Creepiful Wood” (in footnotes, of all places!), and having examples of the shovel request form in the appendix.

The characters resonate, from gruff Podo to the bookish Oskar N. Reteep. The action moves along with 51 short, well-paced chapters. The tone is often kept a little light, but the tension areas will still have the kids holding onto a pillow and begging for one more chapter. The story is not an allegory, and there is not a strong overt spiritual tone (keeping in line with books like Narnia), but the underlying theme is potent for those with eyes to see.

I greatly enjoyed the book overall. It was a quick read, yet I can still pick it up while preparing for this post and find myself delighting in the story. There are a few points where he jumps into another character’s head, making me as a reader stop and wonder what just happened to the perspective. However, these are few and minor overall. I must state a warning though: reading this book in public may cause you to be the recipient of funny looks from people, as you read a clever passage, process it, and giggle like you just got a joke.

If you want to read a witty, light-hearted, yet poignant tale from a talented new author, then pick up Edge and enjoy the ride. When you’re done, you’ll be saying along with many others it’s “jouncey as a two-ton bog pie.”

CSFF Tour – Review of Dark Sea of Darkness

What do you get when you take a talented songwriter, put him in a fantasy land, and allow him some whimsy as he tells a story? You would do pretty doggone good if you ended up with On the Edge of the Dark Sea of Darkness.

Andrew Peterson has made several critically acclaimed albums, and now he turns his talent to a tale of adventure, peril, lost jewels, and the fearsome toothy cows of Skree. Edge is the first book in the Wingfeather Saga. It is being marketed as a young adult (YA) series, but it is such an enchanting tale it shouldn’t be missed by an adult audience.

The story features Janner Igiby, his brother Tink, and their crippled sister Leeli as they go to enjoy the Dragon Day festival in their town of Glipwood. These three children live with their mother Nia and their peglegged ex-pirate grandpa Podo, and they are greatly loved. Their life would be perfect, if not for the occupation of Skree by the Fangs of Dang, led by a Nameless Evil (called Gnag the Nameless). Janner, as the oldest, is tasked with keeping an eye on his siblings, but finds this duty is harder to fulfill than originally planned. Soon they are in the midst of great adventure and danger, such as haunted houses, aforementioned toothy cows, sock men, and giant Nuggets.

This book reminds me of the movie and book The Princess Bride. Peterson creates a well-thought out fantasy world that has a wink and a nod to it. The reader can tell he had fun writing it, and the enjoyment comes out in the little goofiness sprinkled throughout. He creates little touches like fake references to Skreean literature such as “Taming the Creepiful Wood” (in footnotes, of all places!), and having examples of the shovel request form in the appendix.

The characters resonate, from gruff Podo to the bookish Oskar N. Reteep. The action moves along with 51 short, well-paced chapters. The tone is often kept a little light, but the tension areas will still have the kids holding onto a pillow and begging for one more chapter. The story is not an allegory, and there is not a strong overt spiritual tone (keeping in line with books like Narnia), but the underlying theme is potent for those with eyes to see.

I greatly enjoyed the book overall. It was a quick read, yet I can still pick it up while preparing for this post and find myself delighting in the story. There are a few points where he jumps into another character’s head, making me as a reader stop and wonder what just happened to the perspective. However, these are few and minor overall. I must state a warning though: reading this book in public may cause you to be the recipient of funny looks from people, as you read a clever passage, process it, and giggle like you just got a joke.

If you want to read a witty, light-hearted, yet poignant tale from a talented new author, then pick up Edge and enjoy the ride. When you’re done, you’ll be saying along with many others it’s “jouncey as a two-ton bog pie.”

Really Important Answers – the CSFF Blog Tour Day 1

There are some really important questions out there nowadays, and the Christian Science Fiction and Fantasy (CSFF) blog tour is committed to bringing you MORE really important questions! For instance:

Is a young meep smaller or larger than a flabbit?
What is the best way to rid your garden of thwaps?
Why don’t totatoes belong in a maggotloaf?
Who is the Appreciator of the neat, the strange, and/or the yummy?
What is the proper technique for handyball?
Who won in the great battle between Peet and the (innocent) street sign?
Do scholars agree that Ulambria is a good-sounding name for a city?

And finally, who sang the grand duet with the singing dragons?

If these questions intrigue you, (and you know they do – or if not, they should) then check out the blog tour for Andrew Peterson and his new book, On the Edge of the Dark Sea of Darkness. Find out more at his web site – http://andrew-peterson.com/ or the author moderated blog – http://www.rabbitroom.com/.

Finally, see my fellow tourmates for more information, and check back tomorrow for my review (and maybe a few of the promised answers).

Sally Apokedak
Brandon Barr
Jim Black
Justin Boyer
Jackie Castle
Valerie Comer
CSFF Blog Tour
Gene Curtis
D. G. D. Davidson
Janey DeMeo
Jeff Draper
April Erwin
Beth Goddard
Marcus Goodyear
Todd Green
Jill Hart
Katie Hart
Michael Heald
Timothy Hicks
Christopher Hopper
Kait
Carol Keen
Mike Lynch
Margaret
Rachel Marks
Shannon McNear
Rebecca LuElla Miller
Pamela Morrisson
John W. Otte
Deena Peterson
Rachelle
Steve Rice
Cheryl Russel
Ashley Rutherford
Chawna Schroeder
James Somers
Donna Swanson
Steve Trower
Speculative Faith
Robert Treskillard
Jason Waguespac
Laura Williams
Timothy Wise

Really Important Answers – the CSFF Blog Tour Day 1

There are some really important questions out there nowadays, and the Christian Science Fiction and Fantasy (CSFF) blog tour is committed to bringing you MORE really important questions! For instance:

Is a young meep smaller or larger than a flabbit?
What is the best way to rid your garden of thwaps?
Why don’t totatoes belong in a maggotloaf?
Who is the Appreciator of the neat, the strange, and/or the yummy?
What is the proper technique for handyball?
Who won in the great battle between Peet and the (innocent) street sign?
Do scholars agree that Ulambria is a good-sounding name for a city?

And finally, who sang the grand duet with the singing dragons?

If these questions intrigue you, (and you know they do – or if not, they should) then check out the blog tour for Andrew Peterson and his new book, On the Edge of the Dark Sea of Darkness. Find out more at his web site – http://andrew-peterson.com/ or the author moderated blog – http://www.rabbitroom.com/.

Finally, see my fellow tourmates for more information, and check back tomorrow for my review (and maybe a few of the promised answers).

Sally Apokedak
Brandon Barr
Jim Black
Justin Boyer
Jackie Castle
Valerie Comer
CSFF Blog Tour
Gene Curtis
D. G. D. Davidson
Janey DeMeo
Jeff Draper
April Erwin
Beth Goddard
Marcus Goodyear
Todd Green
Jill Hart
Katie Hart
Michael Heald
Timothy Hicks
Christopher Hopper
Kait
Carol Keen
Mike Lynch
Margaret
Rachel Marks
Shannon McNear
Rebecca LuElla Miller
Pamela Morrisson
John W. Otte
Deena Peterson
Rachelle
Steve Rice
Cheryl Russel
Ashley Rutherford
Chawna Schroeder
James Somers
Donna Swanson
Steve Trower
Speculative Faith
Robert Treskillard
Jason Waguespac
Laura Williams
Timothy Wise

Next Few Posts

So last week was kinda busy. I ran around to a couple of different appointments to find out that my wrist may not quite be broken – still waiting to find out for sure. With all that, and work and life in general, I’m having a hard time posting here regularly. The next few days are committed to blog tours, so I’ll finish my thoughts on God’s sovereignty in fiction after these tours. For the two or three that are reading, that is…

Next Few Posts

So last week was kinda busy. I ran around to a couple of different appointments to find out that my wrist may not quite be broken – still waiting to find out for sure. With all that, and work and life in general, I’m having a hard time posting here regularly. The next few days are committed to blog tours, so I’ll finish my thoughts on God’s sovereignty in fiction after these tours. For the two or three that are reading, that is…

Resurrection – Surely God is with Us

From Rich Mullins’ posthumous album, The Jesus Record:

Surely God is With Us

Mark Robertson and Beaker
Matthew 1:23, Matthew 5:1-12, Matthew 13:54-57
Matthew 21:10-11, Matthew 27:50-54, Luke 7:34-35
Luke 23:33, John 6:14, John 6:35-43
John 7:37-41, John 8:19, John 20:26-29

Well, who’s that man who thinks He’s a prophet?
Well, I wonder if He’s got something up His sleeve
Where’s He from? Who is His daddy?
There’s rumors He even thinks Himself a king
Of a kingdom of paupers
Simpletons and rogues
The whores all seem to love Him
And the drunks propose a toast

And they say, “Surely God is with us.
Well, surely God is with us.”
They say, “Surely God is with us today!”

Who’s that man who says He’s a preacher?
Well, He must be, He’s disturbing all our peace
Where’s He get off, and what is He hiding
And every word He says those fools believe
Who could move a mountain
Who would love their enemy
Who could rejoice in pain
And turn the other cheek

And still say, “Surely God is with us,
Well, surely God is with us,”
Who’ll say, “Surely God is with us today, today!”

They say, “Surely God is with us
Well, surely God is with us”
They say, “Surely God is with us”

Blessed are the poor in spirit
Heaven belongs to them
Blessed are those who make peace
They are God’s children
I Am the Bread of Life, and the Way”
You hear that Man, believe what He says!

Tell me, who’s that Man, they made Him a prisoner
They tortured Him and nailed Him to a tree
Well if He’s so bad, who did He threaten?
Did He deserve to die between two thieves?
See the scars and touch His wounds
He’s risen flesh and bone
Now the sinners have become the saints
And the lost have all come home

And they say, “Surely God is with us (Surely God is with us)
Well, surely God is with us,”
They say, “Surely God is with us today!” (Today!)

They say, “Surely God is with us
Well, surely God is with us”
They say, “Surely God is with us today”

Lyrics from Kid Brothers.

Resurrection – Surely God is with Us

From Rich Mullins’ posthumous album, The Jesus Record:

Surely God is With Us

Mark Robertson and Beaker
Matthew 1:23, Matthew 5:1-12, Matthew 13:54-57
Matthew 21:10-11, Matthew 27:50-54, Luke 7:34-35
Luke 23:33, John 6:14, John 6:35-43
John 7:37-41, John 8:19, John 20:26-29

Well, who’s that man who thinks He’s a prophet?
Well, I wonder if He’s got something up His sleeve
Where’s He from? Who is His daddy?
There’s rumors He even thinks Himself a king
Of a kingdom of paupers
Simpletons and rogues
The whores all seem to love Him
And the drunks propose a toast

And they say, “Surely God is with us.
Well, surely God is with us.”
They say, “Surely God is with us today!”

Who’s that man who says He’s a preacher?
Well, He must be, He’s disturbing all our peace
Where’s He get off, and what is He hiding
And every word He says those fools believe
Who could move a mountain
Who would love their enemy
Who could rejoice in pain
And turn the other cheek

And still say, “Surely God is with us,
Well, surely God is with us,”
Who’ll say, “Surely God is with us today, today!”

They say, “Surely God is with us
Well, surely God is with us”
They say, “Surely God is with us”

Blessed are the poor in spirit
Heaven belongs to them
Blessed are those who make peace
They are God’s children
I Am the Bread of Life, and the Way”
You hear that Man, believe what He says!

Tell me, who’s that Man, they made Him a prisoner
They tortured Him and nailed Him to a tree
Well if He’s so bad, who did He threaten?
Did He deserve to die between two thieves?
See the scars and touch His wounds
He’s risen flesh and bone
Now the sinners have become the saints
And the lost have all come home

And they say, “Surely God is with us (Surely God is with us)
Well, surely God is with us,”
They say, “Surely God is with us today!” (Today!)

They say, “Surely God is with us
Well, surely God is with us”
They say, “Surely God is with us today”

Lyrics from Kid Brothers.