Joining the Syndicate


I’m slowly getting the hang of this blogging thing (I think). At least I’m fooling some people, as I just signed up to help with the Christian Fiction Syndicate. What is this, you ask? Anything with the word “syndicate” in its name can’t be good, right?

The CFS was the brainchild of TL Hines, and was created to boost a book’s profile in the blogosphere. With multiple blogs linking to the same book, it bumps up the book’s listing on all the uber-geeky sites like Technorati and what not. Brandilyn Collins was the focus of the last blog tour, and she describes what it did for her book Web of Lies here and here.

It is an awesome idea and I was excited to participate…except one little hitch. I signed up last week, and it turns out that the next tour is RIGHT NOW. It is for The Hidden by Kathryn Mackel. Since I had such little lead time, I unfortunately didn’t get to read the book or find out much of anything about it. However, just by linking to it, I still fulfill the requirements of the Syndicate. Also, I unabashedly point to Becky Miller’s post on this book to give some useful info on this book.

I should be able to be a full participant next time…should. 😛

Joining the Syndicate


I’m slowly getting the hang of this blogging thing (I think). At least I’m fooling some people, as I just signed up to help with the Christian Fiction Syndicate. What is this, you ask? Anything with the word “syndicate” in its name can’t be good, right?

The CFS was the brainchild of TL Hines, and was created to boost a book’s profile in the blogosphere. With multiple blogs linking to the same book, it bumps up the book’s listing on all the uber-geeky sites like Technorati and what not. Brandilyn Collins was the focus of the last blog tour, and she describes what it did for her book Web of Lies here and here.

It is an awesome idea and I was excited to participate…except one little hitch. I signed up last week, and it turns out that the next tour is RIGHT NOW. It is for The Hidden by Kathryn Mackel. Since I had such little lead time, I unfortunately didn’t get to read the book or find out much of anything about it. However, just by linking to it, I still fulfill the requirements of the Syndicate. Also, I unabashedly point to Becky Miller’s post on this book to give some useful info on this book.

I should be able to be a full participant next time…should. 😛

In Need of a Curse?

I just harkened to a website called Ship of Fools thanks to the Decompose blog by Mike Duran. Of course, the first thing that caught my eye was the “Biblical Curse Generator”. Another random phrase maker on the internet, but one that is straight from the mouth of Old Testament Prophets. How can that not be as fun as turning into a pillar of salt? My favorite one was:

Harken, thou wayward winebibber, for you will have more mother-in-laws than King Solomon!

I don’t know if the rest of the site is cool, but I couldn’t resist that!

In Need of a Curse?

I just harkened to a website called Ship of Fools thanks to the Decompose blog by Mike Duran. Of course, the first thing that caught my eye was the “Biblical Curse Generator”. Another random phrase maker on the internet, but one that is straight from the mouth of Old Testament Prophets. How can that not be as fun as turning into a pillar of salt? My favorite one was:

Harken, thou wayward winebibber, for you will have more mother-in-laws than King Solomon!

I don’t know if the rest of the site is cool, but I couldn’t resist that!

How to Get Spoiled

I’ve been waiting for a while to discuss the name of my blog: Spoiled for the Ordinary. What on earth does that mean? I can imagine that it sounds fairly strange. Sounds like a little kid who is terribly picky, doesn’t it?

“Spoiled for the ordinary” was a phrase I first heard and experienced when I was with Youth With a Mission (YWAM). I went to their Discipleship Training School at their base in Lakeside, Montana when I was 18. I spent 3 months in Montana learning about who God is and what He is all about. I learned about His character and ways. I was with a group of 30+ people: men, women, singles, families, kids, and couples. Then we split into two teams and went on a 2 month outreach. My group went to Thailand, and the other group went to Taiwan.

These 5 months changed my life. I went there as an insecure boy, and left a renewed man. More than ever, my focus was on God’s will for my life and being a disciple every day, with a special interest in reaching people for Him. I experienced a world greater than my own little niche, and saw the great need of people outside of America, and how blessed and over-indulged we are here.

YWAM was an awesome opportunity, and I would never trade it for anything else. However, to be spoiled for the ordinary, one does not specifically attend one of their numerous schools and outreachs (although it would be incredible if you could). Any program or time where you can spend devoted to God’s purposes for an extended period of time ought to give a similar result.

The reason I was spoiled for the ordinary was that I walked with God every day. He wasn’t someone I thought about only in a 15 minute devotion in the morning, or on a Sunday at church. He was real and alive to me. More than that, I depended on Him, along with my teammates, in making it through the day. We had a plan when we got to Thailand, but we quickly learned to follow His plan.

We depended on Him for guidance and provision. Half of my team did not have the funds 2 weeks before we left. All but one received the necessary funds and were able to make the trip. The one left behind? He joined us in 3 days, having his own particular journey with God that touched him where he needed it. We realized that life is an adventure in faith that Jesus calls us too. He says that He only does what He sees the Father doing (John 5:19). We can do the same thing: listen to God each day and go where He directs us.

After living like this, “ordinary” life won’t do. Sure, I have to go to work, pay bills, and have dental work done. But I know that there is so much more to this life. We can live this adventure. Once you’ve tasted God, REALLY walked with Him and see Him move on your behalf to provide, open doors, keep you safe, and make you victorious, then you won’t want to live any other life. You walk in the same physical realm as everyone else, but you see another world as well. Your desire is to make that your reality.

You’ve been spoiled. Ruined for the ordinary.

How to Get Spoiled

I’ve been waiting for a while to discuss the name of my blog: Spoiled for the Ordinary. What on earth does that mean? I can imagine that it sounds fairly strange. Sounds like a little kid who is terribly picky, doesn’t it?

“Spoiled for the ordinary” was a phrase I first heard and experienced when I was with Youth With a Mission (YWAM). I went to their Discipleship Training School at their base in Lakeside, Montana when I was 18. I spent 3 months in Montana learning about who God is and what He is all about. I learned about His character and ways. I was with a group of 30+ people: men, women, singles, families, kids, and couples. Then we split into two teams and went on a 2 month outreach. My group went to Thailand, and the other group went to Taiwan.

These 5 months changed my life. I went there as an insecure boy, and left a renewed man. More than ever, my focus was on God’s will for my life and being a disciple every day, with a special interest in reaching people for Him. I experienced a world greater than my own little niche, and saw the great need of people outside of America, and how blessed and over-indulged we are here.

YWAM was an awesome opportunity, and I would never trade it for anything else. However, to be spoiled for the ordinary, one does not specifically attend one of their numerous schools and outreachs (although it would be incredible if you could). Any program or time where you can spend devoted to God’s purposes for an extended period of time ought to give a similar result.

The reason I was spoiled for the ordinary was that I walked with God every day. He wasn’t someone I thought about only in a 15 minute devotion in the morning, or on a Sunday at church. He was real and alive to me. More than that, I depended on Him, along with my teammates, in making it through the day. We had a plan when we got to Thailand, but we quickly learned to follow His plan.

We depended on Him for guidance and provision. Half of my team did not have the funds 2 weeks before we left. All but one received the necessary funds and were able to make the trip. The one left behind? He joined us in 3 days, having his own particular journey with God that touched him where he needed it. We realized that life is an adventure in faith that Jesus calls us too. He says that He only does what He sees the Father doing (John 5:19). We can do the same thing: listen to God each day and go where He directs us.

After living like this, “ordinary” life won’t do. Sure, I have to go to work, pay bills, and have dental work done. But I know that there is so much more to this life. We can live this adventure. Once you’ve tasted God, REALLY walked with Him and see Him move on your behalf to provide, open doors, keep you safe, and make you victorious, then you won’t want to live any other life. You walk in the same physical realm as everyone else, but you see another world as well. Your desire is to make that your reality.

You’ve been spoiled. Ruined for the ordinary.

Career Goals

My oldest is finishing up kindergarten, and today the local paper published “What I Want to Be When I Grow Up: Class of 2018”. There were doctors, princesses, football players. My boy wanted to be a policeman, which was fairly common. The kids would also list what items they needed to do their job. Bandaids, dresses, badge, police car.

I’m going to keep an eye on his classmate though. This little guy had a rather…ambitious goal.

He wants to be “King of the World”.

Needs:

  1. The whole world (Makes sense)
  2. Crown (Check)
  3. King’s jacket (Check)
  4. Magic stick that throws fire at bad people (This kid is only SIX???)

So for all my friends out there who fancy themselves dictators, emporers, or evil overlords – YOU’VE BEEN WARNED.

Career Goals

My oldest is finishing up kindergarten, and today the local paper published “What I Want to Be When I Grow Up: Class of 2018”. There were doctors, princesses, football players. My boy wanted to be a policeman, which was fairly common. The kids would also list what items they needed to do their job. Bandaids, dresses, badge, police car.

I’m going to keep an eye on his classmate though. This little guy had a rather…ambitious goal.

He wants to be “King of the World”.

Needs:

  1. The whole world (Makes sense)
  2. Crown (Check)
  3. King’s jacket (Check)
  4. Magic stick that throws fire at bad people (This kid is only SIX???)

So for all my friends out there who fancy themselves dictators, emporers, or evil overlords – YOU’VE BEEN WARNED.

Just “Borrowing”

I was catching up on the Charis Connection blog (see links) when I came across a three-part interview with James Scott Bell on The Three Rules of Novel Writing. Under part 2, I came across this:

Some writers, like a James Michener, do a ton of research up front. Others, like Stephen King, wait until the first draft is done and then see what needs to be fleshed out.

I like a method in between. Enough research to write knowingly, then when I come to a place in my WIP that needs detail or depth, I’ll leave a comment in my document and then pick a time to research it out more. I do this so I don’t end up writing a long scene that is completely offbase.

I just thought that was an excellent suggestion. Thank you Mr. Bell, for sharing your little trick! If you don’t already, check out the Charis Connection regularly – you’ll be encouraged if you’re a writer.

Just “Borrowing”

I was catching up on the Charis Connection blog (see links) when I came across a three-part interview with James Scott Bell on The Three Rules of Novel Writing. Under part 2, I came across this:

Some writers, like a James Michener, do a ton of research up front. Others, like Stephen King, wait until the first draft is done and then see what needs to be fleshed out.

I like a method in between. Enough research to write knowingly, then when I come to a place in my WIP that needs detail or depth, I’ll leave a comment in my document and then pick a time to research it out more. I do this so I don’t end up writing a long scene that is completely offbase.

I just thought that was an excellent suggestion. Thank you Mr. Bell, for sharing your little trick! If you don’t already, check out the Charis Connection regularly – you’ll be encouraged if you’re a writer.